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Speeding: How Much Does 3 Points Increase Car Insurance?

Speed limits are there for a reason: They’re to keep you, other road users, and pedestrians as safe as possible. So if you’re caught speeding, you could get 3 points on your licence and a fine of at least £100.

If you get points on your licence, your car insurance is likely to go up. But the amount it will go up will depend on a few factors.

How Much Does 3 Points Increase Car Insurance?

This largely depends on who you’re insured with. Different insurers will have different pricing policies. It also depends on your personal circumstances:

  • Have you any previous motoring offences?
  • Do you already have any points on your licence?
  • How long have you been driving?
  • Have you taken any advanced driving courses?

All of these will likely influence how much your insurer raises your premium.

The exact nature of your speeding offence will also make a difference. Speeding offences are categorised in terms of location and severity. Speeding on a public road is classed as a different offence to speeding on a motorway, for example. Again, your insurer will likely take this into consideration when calculating your premium.

For more information about how points on your licence might affect your premiums, please consult your policy wording.

How Will I Know If I’ve Been Caught Speeding?

Sometimes it’s obvious. The police will pull you over and tell you that you were speeding. They might just give you a verbal warning. But they might also give you a fixed penalty notice (FPN) on the spot, or else take your address so they can send one in the post. If your speeding was particularly bad, they might even order you to go to court – in which case, you can expect a letter in the post with more details.

If you’re caught by a speed camera, within 14 days of the incident you’ll receive a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) and a Section 172 Notice in the post. You’ll have to return this Section 172 notice within 28 days – it’s essentially a means of confirming to the police just who was driving the car.

Next, you’ll either receive – again, in the post – either an FPN, or a letter telling you to go to court. It all depends on the severity of your offence. But if you choose to ignore that Section 172 notice, you’ll almost certainly receive a court summons.

What Happens If I Get a Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN)?

You have a choice to either plead “guilty” or “not guilty”. Plead guilty and you’ll get a £100 fine, and 3 points on your licence, which will be in place for four years. Plead not guilty and you’ll have to go to court to make your case. For more information on how long speeding points stay on your licence read our blog.

If you’ve pled guilty and have a fine to pay, if you’re based in England or Wales, it’s easiest to pay the fine online. If you’re based in Scotland, there’s a slightly different process for paying. And if you’re based in Northern Ireland, you’ll have to contact the Laganside Courts Complex to pay your fine.

If you’re planning to plead not guilty, this is almost never a good idea. If your case is rejected, you might have to pay an even bigger fine (up to £2,500) and you could get even more penalty points. That means even bigger insurance premiums, and potentially a driving suspension.

So in short, taking these things to court is more trouble than it’s worth. It’s best to just pay the £100, accept your 3 points, and vow to drive better in future.

Can I Avoid Points on my Licence?

In some cases, you may be able to avoid getting the fine and the points on your licence by taking a speed awareness course. Just bear in mind that you can’t request this option yourself. It’s absolutely up to the police to decide whether a speed awareness course is appropriate, given your driving history and the nature of your offence.

What Should I Do When I Get the Points on My Licence? Will My Insurers Know Automatically?

If you get any points on your licence, you need to inform your insurers are soon as possible.

Yes, it’s your responsibility to tell your insurer. And no, you can’t simply “forget” to tell them to avoid your insurance going up. That would be fraud, which could void your policy entirely.

You can read our full guide to declaring points on your insurance here.